Cuaderno de otra parte, book launch

Last Saturday in Caracas I presented my new poetry collection, Cuaderno de otra parte. Venezuelan poet Igor Barreto was kind enough to do the honors, and award-winning publishing house Libros del Fuego was responsible for making the book a reality. I am immensely grateful to them and to everyone who came to the book launch.

Cuaderno de otra parte deals with my experiences after leaving Venezuela in 2011 to live in the US. I am part of what is called—rather problematically—"the Venezuelan diaspora," consisting mostly of young people who left the country during the Bolivarian Revolution (1999-present). In these poems, I try to zoom in and out of this social and political reality to explore its contradictions and ambiguities.

Contrapunto published a note about the event.

See more here.

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Santiago AcostaComment
Spaces to Say the Same [Thing]

This Sunday, April 22nd, I will be presenting Letra Muerta's beautiful rendition of Venezuelan poet Hanni Ossot's Espacios para decir lo mismo.

In my opinion, this is by far the most beautiful book published in Venezuela in recent years. Moreover, the translation into English by Luis Miguel Isava is impecable.

The event will be at ID Studio Theater in the Bronx, starting at 2 pm.

 
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Santiago AcostaComment
My poem in Luvina 85

My poem “Mi padre está temblando,” from my unpublished manuscript Cuaderno de otra parte, was featured in Luvina, the literary journal of Universidad de Guadalajara, Mexico.

The issue presents a collection of Latin American “thirty-somethings” whose work the editors regard as “original” and “bold”:

“Luvina ofrece en este número una colección de voces originales que se acompañan y contrastan entre sí, voces con propuestas audaces y estructuras literarias contemporáneas, logrando zanjar el mapa de vicisitudes extendidas en este territorio. Escritores de treinta y tantos años, formados en las mismas décadas en que nació y se ha desarrollado la Feria Internacional del Libro de Guadalajara.”

Neat!

Read the poem here. And check out the full issue here.

 
Santiago AcostaComment